Southern District of New York Holds the CFPB Is Unconstitutionally Structured

By: Louise Bowes Marencik, Diana M. Eng, and Jonathan K. Moore

On June 21, 2018, the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (“Southern District”) held that Title X of the Dodd Frank Act, which established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) as an “independent bureau” within the Federal Reserve System, is unconstitutional.

In Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. RD Legal Funding, LLC, et al., the CFPB and The People of the State of New York, by Eric T. Schneiderman, Attorney General for the State of New York (collectively, “Plaintiffs”) alleged that the defendant entities violated the Consumer Financial Protection Act (“CFPA”) by offering cash advances to consumers awaiting payouts on settlement agreements or judgments entered in their favor, which Plaintiffs argued were actually usurious loans prohibited by state law. 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 104132 (S.D.N.Y. June 21, 2018). The consumers at issue were class members in the National Football League Concussion Litigation class action, and individuals eligible for compensation from the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund of 2001. Continue reading

Second Circuit Confirms Interest Disclaimer Not Required on Collection Notices Not Accruing Interest

By: Edward W. Chang, Jonathan M. Robbin, Scott E. Wortman, Diana M. Eng, Hilary F. Korman

In a win for the collection industry, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed an “interest disclaimer” is only necessary on collection notices if the debt is accruing interest. While this much-needed clarification may reduce the volume of “reverse-Avila” FDCPA litigation, questions still remain about the best method to accurately characterize balances in collection notices.

Background

In Taylor v. Fin. Recovery Servs., Inc., No. 17-1650-cv (“Taylor”), the Second Circuit confirmed that the appellants (and many other members of the consumer bar) were misapplying its decision in Avila v. Riexinger & Associates, LLC, 817 F.3d 72 (2d Cir. 2016) (“Avila”).1 In Avila, the Second Circuit ruled that a debt collector violates 15 U.S.C. § 1692e of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) if it identifies the “current balance” of a debt without disclosing that such balance could increase due to the accrual of interest or fees. In that case, interest was actually accruing on the subject debt. Continue reading

D.C. Circuit Sets Aside FCC’s Expansive Interpretation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act

By: Wayne StreibichEdward W. ChangJonathan M. RobbinScott E. WortmanDiana M. Eng, and Hilary F. Korman

In a significant ruling for businesses, technological progress, and the economy at large, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously granted in part, and denied in part, various petitions for review of the Federal Communications Commission’s (“FCC”) adoption of its 2015 Declaratory Ruling and Order (the “2015 Order”) on the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”). The 2015 Order significantly changed the legal landscape of the TCPA, and had serious global consequences for numerous markets and businesses. In ACA Int’l v. FCC, (D.C. Cir. Mar. 16, 2018), the D.C. Circuit provided guidance on a number of issues, including the FCC’s “unreasonably expansive interpretation” of what constitutes an “Automatic Telephone Dialing System” or “ATDS” under the TCPA.

Background

Congress enacted the TCPA in 1991 to curb abusive telemarketing practices and encroachments on business and consumer privacy. The TCPA contains a private right of action permitting aggrieved parties to recover $500 for each call made (or text message sent) in violation of the statute, and up to $1,500 for each “willful or knowing” violation. See 47 U.S.C. § 227(b)(3). However, with the evolution of technology, statutory damages that may have seemed reasonable in 1991 have since morphed into a mammoth threat against any company employing automated dialing equipment. The FCC (the agency vested with the authority to promulgate regulations implementing the TCPA’s requirements) has further compounded the issue by propounding a litany of rulemakings and declaratory rulings that have expanded the scope and reach of the TCPA. Continue reading

Third Circuit Holds “Settlement Language” in Collection Letter Can Be Misleading

By: Jonathan M. RobbinEdward W. Chang, and Scott E. Wortman

Action Item: In a change of course from its prior holding in Huertas v. Galaxy Asset Mgmt., 641 F.3d 28 (3d Cir. 2011), the Third Circuit rules that the terms “settlement” and “settlement offer,” in connection with collecting of a time barred debt, may connote litigation and thus mislead a consumer. However, the Court continues to hold that settlement terms alone do not necessarily constitute deceptive or misleading practices under the FDCPA.

In a unanimous published decision in Tatis v. Allied Interstate LLC, No. 16-4022 (3d Cir.) the Third Circuit reversed the District of New Jersey’s granting of a motion to dismiss. The lower court had held that a debt collector’s attempt to collect the time-barred debt did not violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) because the collection letter was not accompanied by a threat of legal action. In its order overruling the lower court, the Third Circuit deviated from its prior holding in Huertas v. Galaxy Asset Mgmt., 641 F.3d 28 (3d Cir. 2011) and instead looked to the more recent decisions from its sister circuits—the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh—which all held that the term “settle” could mislead a consumer. Continue reading

Eastern District of New York Court Holds Debt Collection Letter Stating Settlement May Have Tax Consequences Does Not Violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

By: Jonathan M. Robbin, Diana M. Eng, and Andrea Roberts

In Ceban v. Capital Management Services, L.P., Case No. 17-cv-4554 (E.D.N.Y. Jan. 17, 2018), the District Court held that the statement “[t]his settlement may have tax consequences” in a debt collection letter does not violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”).

On or about August 6, 2016, Plaintiff, Julian Ceban (“Plaintiff”) received a collection letter from defendant Capital Management Services, L.P. (“Defendant”) concerning his outstanding debt (the “Letter”). The letter stated, in relevant part, that Defendant was “authorized to accept less than the full balance due as settlement” and that Plaintiff could “contact [Defendant] to discuss a potential settlement.” Further, the letter indicated: “This settlement may have tax consequences. If you are uncertain of the tax consequences, consult a tax advisor.” Continue reading

California District Court Holds that a Debt Collector’s Retention of a Portion of a Transactional Fee Voluntarily Paid by the Consumer for Purposes of Convenience Was a Violation of the Rosenthal Fair Debt Collections Practices Act

By:  Nadia D. Adams

In April Lindblom v. Santander Consumer USA Inc., No. 15-cv-0990 (E.D. Cal. January 22, 2018), the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California held that the plaintiffs’ voluntary payment of a transactional fee that was not expressly authorized in the contract between the parties or by California state law was concrete injury sufficient to confer Article III standing.

The Court also held that where the underlying contract between the parties was silent on the debt collector’s retention of a transactional fee for online and telephone payments, the parties could not subsequently orally modify that contract to allow for the fee; the fee must be contemplated at the time the debt is created. Therefore, the debt collector’s portion of the fee violated the Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (the “Rosenthal Act”). Continue reading

Eleventh Circuit Holds that Voicemails Are “Communications” and Clarifies “Meaningful Disclosure” Under the FDCPA

By:  Diana M. Eng and Paul Messina, Jr.

In Stacey Hart v. Credit Control, LLC, No. 16-17126 (11th Cir. Sept. 22, 2017), the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit clarified two significant definitions under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”), one of which was a novel issue for the Court.  First, the Eleventh Circuit ruled that the first voicemail that Credit Control LLC (“Credit Control”) left for Stacey Hart (“Hart”) qualified as a “communication” within the meaning of 15 U.S.C. § 1692a(2).  Because the voicemail was the initial communication between the parties, Credit Control had to provide the required disclosures under 15 U.S.C. § 1692e(11), commonly known as the “mini Miranda” warning.

Second, the Eleventh Circuit determined the novel issue of what constitutes a “meaningful disclosure” under the FDCPA by ruling that an individual caller is not required to disclose his/her identity as long the caller discloses that the call is being made on behalf of a debt collection company and the debtor collection company’s name.

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